Art Marathon: ready…

It doesn’t feel quite right leaving the New York experience so vague. I can’t even begin to describe what an enormous impact it had on all of us – that must be one reason I’m leaving it undocumented – I doubt I’d have the words or pictures to do the experience justice, although don’t get me wrong I have been trying!

October brings a month of getting my chips all lined up for more epic-ness. This month I have two frighteningly brilliant events to prepare and execute. The first on the calendar is the installation of a temporary public artwork on the Boat Ramp at Marino – with assistance from the City of Marion & as part of the Place2012 festival. This is my first public artwork, and I’m really excited! It happened quite organically – I had an idea, approached the council, they loved it and now we are all systems go! In the next few days Marino residents will get a little letter in their mailbox:

12.10.12

Dear Marino Residents,
This letter is to inform you of a short-term public artwork to be installed between October 24th and 27th on a section of the old Marino Boat Ramp. This artwork is designed by emerging City of Marion artist Aurelia Carbone, currently studying for her doctorate at the University of South Australia.
Aurelia is interested in anamorphic images, exploring designs that only form into recognisable shapes from a particular point of view. If you would like to come and view the artwork, Aurelia will mark the exact spot to stand on, when the work is complete, in order to view it to full effect. The painted image will be made with the absolute safety of our precious marine environment in mind. Aurelia uses environmentally friendly materials and methods so that they can cause no harm.
Aurelia says “For this new artwork at Marino I reflected on my experiences growing up and exploring this unique and fascinating corner of our coastline. I often acted out tales of exploration and discovery amongst the ragged rocks and found tide pools full of mystery.

This work is intended to fade over time as it is eroded by the sea and weather. It is my hope that, in time, it will become another of Marino Rocks’ secrets.”
Aurelia will be using projection on the evening of Wednesday October 24th to map out her image, before commencing painting work. There may be a generator running on that night from dusk, shutting down before midnight. If you have any concerns regarding this, please contact Marg Edgecombe, Unit Manager, Arts & Cultural Development on 0411 339 739.
This temporary public artwork is part of City of Marion’s participation in “Place 2012”; a series of Adelaide events exploring, and stimulating conversation about, our sense of place. We hope you, and the wider community, will be engaged by this site-specific cultural expression in your local area.
Regards,

Hope Deane
City of Marion
Public Art & Placemaking Officer
Telephone: 8375 6828
hope.deane@marion.sa.gov.au

How is that for support! So far it’s been a really positive experience.

The logistics have been interesting – because the work will be on the beach I wanted to make sure I was using materials that wouldn’t be harmful to the marine life ( who wants to be responsible for making a leafy sea dragon sick? Not me.) The Environmental Protection Agency were very helpful in looking over the project and the materials I was suggesting. I’m also battling the tides, so we have planned the project install for a dodge tide. I had no idea there was such a thing! Here is a digital mock-up of what I hope the project will look like when it’s complete.

Planned anamorphic artwork at the Marino boat ramp, Marino, South Australia

November 2nd 2012 is the opening night of my solo show in the Project Space at the Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia. The exhibition is titled instant perspective machine and will involve the participation of the audience as an integral part of the machine’s operation – essentially the machine needs someone to drive it and I’d love that someone to be you. I will be reconfiguring the Space into an enormous optical illusion site, complete with a recording device in the form of a heavily modified Fuji Instax camera. Work the switches & make some pictures – it will be a lot more fun if you play too.

I’ll try to squeeze in a few more entries while the projects are in progress. Wish me luck!

The Busy

My head is still spinning @_@ my Northern Hemisphere Summer with the MFA Photo program at Parsons has been intense. It’s not my preference to make work at such an accelerated pace – I’m slow even by normal standards – but it was a superlative opportunity and I’m more than a bit sad that it’s over 🙁 I NY, I love Parsons, and I love the current MFA Photo students – it’s been a thrill to be surrounded by sensationally talented photographers.

I used the residency to experiment with something I’ve been thinking about for a long time. I’m often being encouraged (by people I really should listen to) to make video or animations. I find that suggestion a bit overwhelming as I will need a whole new skill set, new equipment, and a clue about where to start. As a warm up to working with longer narratives I’ve made a new photocomic.





The space I was given to work with had some quirks that I used to start the story narrative. I’d been working on this little puppet for such a long time – but I really didn’t know what he was going to get up to. The pipes and the little hole in the wooden floor gave me my staring point, from there the story just …grew? (the pun princess strikes again!) It was a very fun project, especially working with multiple anamorphic shapes in one spot. It got a bit complex there for a few days, see:

I do have some ideas about we the story goes next, and some more characters to introduce. That will have to wait until we are back home in Australia.

After I’d finished shooting for the little project above I discovered that I really wanted to use the space for another image for the Honest Magic series. Lucky for me Orlando was keen to be involved again.

The Parsons Summer Open Studios also gave me an opportunity to try out something I’m very interested in: incorporating an anamorphic installation and viewpoint as part of an exhibition. I transformed an old enlarger lens (found at a flea market on West 59th street) into a peep-hole device for the void illusion in my studio. It was great! :duck: It’s given me some fantastic ideas for my Project Space show at CACSA in November 😀

Zo babe sure liked it.

fail cakes

Achieving the final photograph involving brainstorm took three photo shoots … each time purely because I made silly film-photography errors. (I use a 4×5 Horseman monorail camera and sheet film.) In the first shoot I forgot that the orange colour would turn out nearly the same shade of grey as the stairwell in a black and white photograph. On the second go I neglected to compensate adequately for the red filter I was using to bring the orange out from the stairs. Lucky for me third time was lucky and I achieved the image that had been floating around in my brain since 2010.

There were some images from the ‘fail’ shoots that I really like that weren’t quite right for the project, but are much too interesting to hide away in oblivion. I’m calling them ‘fail cakes’ because they are similar to baking mishaps -lopsided and not really fit for company, but delicious nevertheless.

The spooky factor was amplified in the fail cakes photo shoots. My sister Delana was helping me for the first attempt, that’s her in the foreground.

ghosts in the stairwell

I love the shallow depth of field. It’s pure photogeekery, but one of the things I adore about using a 4×5 camera is tilt – being able to make the plane of sharp focus run up the stairs – but having everything else out of focus. Unfortunately the optical illusion gets lost in all the photography tricks.

Underexposure in this instance looks spooky as all get out. Why is that boy reading on the stairs in the dark with bare feet? No amount of fiddling was going to get past that the shot is much too underexposed to make a good print at the enormous size I’m working with for this series.

reading in the dark

expanding realities

- from the series Honest Magic


Ta da! This is my latest in the Honest Magic series which forms part of the artefact component of my Masters of Visual Art by Research studies.

This image was the reason for my sudden divergence into art in public places with the optical illusion installation brainstorm. That’s a lot of work for a photograph, I know. It’s just the way I roll. In actual fact brainstorm took less time to make than hand embroidering the the illusion in the image world building (also part of Honest Magic).

There’s always a risk of “ruining the magic” of an artwork when the artist tries to explain what it’s about, and I’m really reluctant to tread that fine line. Because this work is part of my research project I really do need to explain myself. This as-yet-untitled photograph is my interpretation of the mind-altering effects of reading any kind of book as a pre-literate child. Luigi Serafini also attempted to recreate this feeling of the edges of understanding (for adults who learnt to read long ago) with his acclaimed Codex Seraphinianus.

Many, many thanks to my very patient and helpful son Orlando for continuing to be good natured about appearing in my photographs, my husband Brian for the one hundred million ways in which he is helpful, and James Jean for the inspiration behind the image.